Content Creation

1000 666 Sam Wright

Tight Briefs – How to get a content brief right for Digital PR!

Every copywriter has experienced a bad brief in their time but when it comes to Digital PR, there’s no time for a bad brief, especially if you’re working on a reactive or newsjacking piece.  

PR copy needs to be so much more than just a catchy headline. Your copywriter will need to deliver on-topic, quality copy that not only gains the interest of journalists but also engages readers once it’s published.

So, before you get started on briefing your copywriter, here are 6 top tips for creating a tight brief so good that not only will your copywriter thank you for it, but you’ll get the very best content delivered in return.

1. List of assets 

Make it clear the type of content you require your copywriter to create for you, whether it’s a newsjacking piece, reactive piece, copy for a landing page or a pitch.

A digital PR copywriter will need to understand the format and writing style of the copy you want them to deliver before they get started crafting your copy.

2. Tone of voice 

Who are you? Providing your copywriter with a tone of voice document (or TOV as they’ll probably refer to it) can help your copywriter understand how to produce content that truly represents your brand.

A tone of voice document should include a description of how your brand’s voice should sound –  is it serious, fun, informative, formal or casual? It should also give your copywriter guidance on the types of language they can use, from contractions and colloquialisms to the use of adjectives.

3. Purpose of the piece 

Give your copywriter an insight into what the copy is supposed to achieve? What is the angle or the purpose of the piece that you’re briefing them on? It’s also important that your copywriter understands how you, as the client, should tie into the content piece and the subject you’re briefing them on.

4. Set a clear word limit 

Setting a clear word limit is a great way to help your copywriter gauge the writing approach they should take to your brief. For example, if you’re briefing your copywriter to write content for a pitch with a low word count, your copywriter will know to write short, snappy and to the point copy. Alternatively, a brief for a landing page that has a higher word count, will allow your copywriter to generate content that has more detail and explores more angles.

5. Audience 

Who is your audience? You’ll get the best content out of your copywriter if they have a good understanding of who they are writing for and can have the audience in mind when creating your copy. Helpful indicators to include on who your audience is are the age group, sex, socio-economic profile, occupation and interests of the people you want to target.

Brand immersion sessions and onboarding sessions are also great ways to help your copywriter really understand your brand. Inviting your copywriter along gives them the opportunity to get a feel for who you are and it gives them a chance to ask questions too.

6. Clear deadlines 

Digital PR is known for its short turnaround times, but it’s important to set clear deadlines for you and your copywriter that are mindful of how long the full copywriting process takes.

What do we mean by this? Once your copywriter receives their brief, they will need to spend time researching the piece before they can even begin to start working their magic with words, and then there’s the proofreading and editing process to take into account too.

Top tips for writing content in digital PR

  • Know your brief – From the tone of voice of your client and the purpose of the piece to the audience you’re targeting, you need to have a good understanding of these elements before creating any content.
  • Don’t skimp on the research – Knowledge is power and the more insight and understanding you have around the topic you’re writing about, will really come across in your work.
  • Make your writing newsworthy – When writing for digital PR, you need to create interesting angles in the content you write and ensure it’s both engaging and attention-grabbing. That’s because, not only does your content need to encourage journalists to snap it up, but it also needs to serve its purpose of interesting the audience it was originally created for.
  • Remember you’re writing as the client When copywriting, it can sometimes be tempting to let your creativity run away with you, but if the content you’re creating is starting to sound more like you and less like your client, you need to reign those creative juices back in!
1000 666 Tori Alanis-Saunders

7 Social Media Accounts You Should Follow for Data Inspiration

Data is at the forefront of many of the campaigns we produce here at JBH. Using credible datasets as part of our digital PR campaigns adds value and authority to the story we’re telling.

There’s a common misconception that data can’t be interesting or lacks the intrigue of a big creative campaign, but I would argue the opposite. Data in a digestible format can create some of the most compelling (and link worthy) stories.

For someone working in digital PR, failing to have the data to support a ‘lightbulb moment’ idea can mean that a campaign fails to see the light of day – the worst nightmare for any digital PR we’re sure you’ll agree!

So, with that in mind, I’ve brought together a list of my favourite people to get inspiration from, particularly helpful if you prefer scrolling through social media, rather than scrolling through databases.

Mona Chalabi – @monschalabi

The New York based data journalist has a myriad of achievements, from being recognised by the Royal Statistical Society to being on show at the Tate, she is at the forefront of data journalism.

Chalabi’s work is incredibly creative and thought provoking, tackling data on race, gender, health, income and everything in between. She is not one to shy away from a shocking stat, her unique style has given her the edge in the saturated field of data journalism.

 

Our World in Data – @OurWorldInData

A familiar name if you have dealt with data, founded by Max Roser, University of Oxford researcher Our World in Data is the most serious social media account on the list. With hard hitting facts and figures about global issues, it is one of the most trustworthy sources on social media.

 

Chartr – @chartrdaily

Chartr leads the way on social media with over 200 thousand followers on Instagram, they provide compelling stories led by data. Presented in a clear and concise way, their accounts offer a mixture of fun and serious datasets. They even send the data straight to your inbox with free newsletters, making the data collection process even easier.

 

Brian Xu – @Bri_Xu

Xu is a Senior Data Scientist at Linkedin, outside of his career he is one of the few data scientists with a flourishing TikTok account where he shares all things data.

From sharing datasets, his life as a data scientist to advice on entering into the world of data science, Xu is extremely knowledgeable and passionate about data. By creating quick videos showing interesting datasets and stats he has made it possible to quickly digest data whilst scrolling through the for you page.

@bri_xu##stitch with @zacharyloft imma bout to crtl+c, crtl+v this audio with stats stay tuned ##data ##diversity ##representation♬ original sound – brian xu

 

Hana – @trendinganalytics

Hana is a data mentor with many platforms offering data assistance, visualisation tips and a free data course. The analyst frequently uploads her tips to help her TikTok fans upskill for free.

Although she shares mostly visualization tips she is a key follow on Tiktok as occasionally you may not have time to involve a graphic designer for a quick reactive piece. Having the ability to visualise your data is paramount.

@trendinganalytics##dataviz ##data ##dataanalytics ##datascience ##dataanalysis ##dataanalyst ##womeintech ##datavisualisation ##datascientist ##businessanalytics♬ Steven Universe – L.Dre

 

The Colour of Data – @thecolourofdata 

This hidden gem was created by Sophie Shawdon, Lead Analyst at Clearscore. The account provides a really fascinating collection of original data visualisation posts presented in a creative way making the data both digestible and entertaining.

She is truly a breath of fresh air in the world of grey tables and graphs.

 

DataDimes – @datadimes

DataDimes is the account to follow if you want to see data from a variety of sources, combining serious datasets about health and covid with more lighthearted data about most popular donut flavours. With credit given on every post, it is a great way to funnel data from a variety of sources to one account.

 

Where else can you get data inspiration?

If you are still struggling to find data inspiration, these are my two top tips for navigating the data world to help you develop your data potential.

Podcasts and Webinars 

The easiest way to digest new information and to find inspiration is through podcasts, whether it is a dedicated data podcast or following your favourite data journalist to find out what appearances they are making on podcasts.

There is nothing like hearing an expert discuss how they develop campaigns or articles from the ground up.

The Guardian’s Ashley Kirk is another key expert in the data field, now part of this year’s Forbes 30 Under 30 list, he is making strides in the data journalism and visualisation field. A natural leader and teacher he is also a visiting lecturer, teaching data journalism at City University of London. Listen to Kirk here:

BBC Radio 4 have a valuable podcast on how to navigate the world of data with their podcast More or Less: Behind the Stats. With short episodes that keep you engaged, the podcast tackles current topics with statistics. Listen here:

At JBH we are always sharing our campaigns on our socials, follow @JBHdigitalpr across Twitter, Linkedin and Instagram for campaign and data inspiration.

1000 666 Rebecca Moss

How E-A-T impacts your link building efforts

For the past two years there has been an acronym that kept SEOs around the world on their toes; SEO and Digital PR agencies are no exception: E-A-T. It has been around since 2014 but it only was towards the end of 2018 that it became more obvious that those three aspects have a direct impact on a websites’ rankings in Google Search. It stands for Expertise, Authoritativeness and Trustworthiness. But what does that mean?

Book with words "From the real experts". Photo by Rita Morais on Unsplash

Photo by Rita Morais on Unsplash

Expertise

If we take this whole discussion offline: Would you trust the medical advice your neighbour gives, or would you rather ask somebody with a medical degree? If you have a question on your tax return, would you ask your taxi driver for advice or rather see an accountant? Would you let your roommate take photos of your products or would you rather hire an experienced and skilled photographer? Well, the same applies online. If your business or your website is about a topic that can directly impact somebody’s life (e.g. financial trading, medical or legal advice), contribute to public opinion (journalism for example) or provide a service that requires knowledge, you should inform your readers and clients why you are qualified to do so. It builds trust and shows that you know what you are talking about.

How to show expertise on your website

A clear About Us page and author profiles are the first and foremost thing to do. Tell readers who you are, why you offer the service you offer and what qualifies you to write the things you write. If you have a legal website, tell them where you got your law degree. If you have a medical website, tell them where your authors got their knowledge from and what scientific evidence they can provide. If it is financial trading, list the experience your authors have in trading, financial markets and technical analysis.

Ideally, there is more than an author bio for each person publishing for your business. Social media profiles, activity in specialised forums, an own expert blog or publications (e.g. books, whitepapers), are just a few of those things that can increase credibility. It goes without saying that the information must be correct! If you are lying about education and experience, you will never be able to be trusted as an expert.

Equally beneficial are case studies of previous work where you state what you have done, why you have done it in that particular way and why it was successful.

Expertise in your link building campaigns

The same applies to link building campaigns. Add the information as to who created the content asset, where the information comes from and how you came to your conclusion/the statement you make. If your campaign contains quotes or information from an expert in the field, it can also increase your reach. A true expert usually has quite some following on social media or own platforms. Your campaign could reach that audience too.

Apart from that, it is much more likely to get a link if a respected expert stands behind a campaign.

"Product Review" in scrabble letters.Photo by Shotkit from Pexels.

Photo by Shotkit from Pexels

Authoritativeness

Authority refers directly to reputation and is built over time. If your website is the go-to resource for a certain topic, you are the authority in the field. It is almost impossible to measure authority. However, there are some clear indications. The most important one are links to your websites. All link metrics, DR in Moz, DA in Ahrefs or TF in Majestic refer directly to backlinks coming from authoritative websites.

If you want to get an understanding of your authority, mentions and branding are equally important. How do others talk about your brand? In which context are you mentioned? Who mentions you? Those references do not have to be from another authority in the field, but also your customers or business partners can contribute to your reputation. Positive customer reviews on external resources (e.g. Trustpilot) help building authority.

How to show authoritativeness on your website

Authority is mostly measured externally through links and mentions on third party sites. What you can do is replicate what is being said about your brand on your own website. The positive reviews you get on websites like Trustpilot or Google Reviews can be mentioned on your website with a link to the original source. If you have worked with other reputable companies or brands, you can mention them on a partners page.

Authoritativeness in your link building campaigns

Authority is directly related to link building. If your website has backlinks from other reputable sites in your niche and if your brand is mentioned in a positive way on external websites, it increases authoritativeness. Building authority, just as link building, takes time. It does not come overnight.

What you should not do is try to manipulate it by building PBNs or buying links. At JBH, we strongly advise against these tactics. It might seem as if they can speed up the process, but sooner or later you might lose all credibility. If you are being caught for paid links, also the organic links will lose their impact and you can never become an authority in the field. The same is true for selling links on your website. It might bring you some short-term cash but will hurt your reputation in the long-term.

Two pairs of hands holding each other. Photo by Pixabay from Pexels.

Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

Trustworthiness

Let us perform the same test as for expertise and take the question offline: Would you buy a property that you cannot find on a map because the address is incorrect? Do you buy from a shop on the high street that shows different prices in the shop window than the prices on the shelf? The same is true for your website. If visitors do not trust you, they are not going to buy from you either. If Google does not perceive your website as being trust-worthy, it will not rank your website in search.

Trustworthiness is a very subjective measure and if you are unsure about it, just ask yourself: would you trust your website if you looked at it for the first time?

How to show trustworthiness on your website

As with any human interaction, trust is built as the result of a multitude of things and is destroyed quickly. The most important aspect is truthfulness. Be transparent about who you are and what you do. All information provided on your website must be true. If they catch you with a lie, you will never be trusted.

This refers mostly to your About Us page and the contact information. Provide true information and as much about yourself and your business as you can. Any address or contact information should be correct and if a customer contacts you, make sure you reply. Nothing could hurt your trustworthiness more than a disconnected telephone line or bad customer service.

In the same way that customer reviews can help with authority, user-generated content can help building trust. Make sure you monitor any comments left on your website and respond in due time.

Other important aspects of trust building are brand consistency, professional layout/design and of course proper grammar and language use. Readers will not trust your website if your content is a bad machine translation with obvious spelling mistakes.

We spoke about case studies to show expertise. Part of transparency is to also mention the failures and the things that did not work. Nobody is getting things right all the time. If your success seems to be too perfect, you might also lose trust.

Not to forget are commercial links, pop ups and ads. Use them wisely and only where appropriate. Would you trust a website that is cluttered with ads that distract from the content?

Trustworthiness in your link building campaigns

This aspect can be summarized in a very simple way: If people don’t trust you, they won’t link to you. Simple as that!

It becomes especially important for data-led campaigns for link building. Place a methodology and sources below the content or the infographic where you state clearly where your data came from and how you came to the conclusion you made. If you ran a survey to collect the data, provide the details about where, when, who and how. List the steps you went through when you analysed the data. If you took statistics from third party websites, ensure that those are trustworthy and list every single source you used.

When you contact journalists and distribute your content, mention who you are and how you can be contacted.

E-A-T for link building

If we look at all those recommendations once again, it becomes obvious that those should be part of a good editorial standard. Unfortunately, bad practices on the internet have caused for those to be forgotten over time and many publishers need to be reminded again. If you get your E-A-T right and remember it in everything you do for your business online, it will not only improve your organic rankings. It will also facilitate any link building campaign. The moment you are a trusted expert that is perceived as an authority, others will happily refer to your website with a backlink.

1024 682 Jane Hunt

Writers block: How to find inspiration when you are stuck for content ideas

If we’re being completely honest, we all know these situations. You try to come up with a creative idea but all you end up with is an empty piece of paper. It simply does not flow.

We have all been there and it is part of the creative process to be stuck sometimes. The important thing is knowing how to get out of it and keep the creative juices flowing. What to do? How to spark your creativity when you are feeling uninspired?

Look around you

The easiest way to kickstart the ideation process – and we do that often for creative link building campaigns – is to look at the things others have done. No matter the topic – travel, music, even engineering and mathematics – a lot of content has been created and is just waiting for you to be explored. Google your topic and see what comes up:

Screenshot from Google search for infographics about maths

We bet you did not know that there was a math awareness month. This is where the inspiration starts. Other than a Google search, sources like Pinterest, Instagram and Visually can be used to see what others have done in the past. Now look at this content, identify what resonates with you and why. What have they done that makes the topic work? How could you use it and add a twist?

Asking the right questions

Another way to get content inspiration is to find out what questions your audience is asking. This is also a good marketing technique and you are probably taking this into account already, but we sometimes forget that it can also be used to make your life easier. A good point of call is social media. Check what your audience is talking about. Did your social media team publish anything recently that triggered many comments or questions? Here is your starting point.

You can also use Google Trends to find out what people are talking about this week:

Screenshot from Google Trends early November 2020

Other tools you can draw upon are answerthepublic.com or alsoasked.com. All you must do is enter your topic and see related questions coming up.

Screenshot from answerthepublic.com for the topic Mathematics

What is happening around you?

Another approach that has proven useful this year is reactive PR. Traditionally it was understood as a reaction to negative press, but amidst a global pandemic, reactive strategies have become the new thing in digital PR. You are anyways monitoring your industry and you know what is going on. Is there any inspiration in this? Maybe you published a post a month ago that is no longer relevant. You can pick this topic up again. Did any circumstances for your customers change recently? If we stick to our maths topic, we could think of the way how 2020 has changed the way we teach maths. You could reach out to teachers and interview them about teaching from home. Are there any maths topics that are easier to teach in a classroom? How did remote learning change their way of explaining mathematical concepts? That is how easily you get an idea!

Re-utilize your own content

We already spoke about the content others have published as a source of inspiration, but what about your own content? Is there anything else that you can do with content you previously published? Is there anything else you could do with the original data? Maybe you used it for a blog post, maybe there is a graphic you can create out of it. If you had lots of pictures, maybe you can create a slideshow out of those you did not use for the post. If we look back at our maths example, you might have published the interview with the math teacher. Did he mention any specific calculations you could elaborate on? There might be opportunity for blog posts to explain some of the concepts he mentioned in the interview and so on…

What inspires you?

Creative minds can usually tell you exactly what it is that inspires them. Some go to the bathroom, others take a long walk in the woods, others listen to music. You probably have something as well that sparks your creativity. The common trait of all those techniques is to distract the mind. Stop thinking too hard about being creative! Stop the logic! The best way to do so is to get your mind onto something else.

If it does not help or if you simply cannot go for a walk in the woods right now, there are some quick exercises that can get you into the right mindset. You could take a random object, e.g. a chair, and give it new meaning. If this was not a chair, what would it be? A clothes hanger? A bookshelf? A ladder? See what you can come up with, but don’t think too much. Just write down a few ideas.

Alternatively, you could take randomly selected images, look at them and create a connection between them.

When we tried it, it created those 4 images:

Baby dressed up in a beach outfit. Image by <a href="https://pixabay.com/users/hisins30-3587860/ Skateboard flying through the air, the feet are visible. Image by <a href="https://pixabay.com/users/santa3-3503898/
Pink high heels with grass growing in them. Image by <a href="https://pixabay.com/users/manfredrichter-4055600/ Water drops in front of a blue background. Image by <a href="https://pixabay.com/users/inspiredimages-57296/

How do you make a connection? Maybe the baby is dreaming of riding a skateboard, jumping and flying through the air. But in reality, it looks as if it is trying mum’s heels that are 5 sizes too big walking over the grass that the hoar frost has turned wet.

Are you feeling inspired? Try it yourself. Generate some random images and see what this exercise does to your creative mind.

And if nothing helps, you can still get back to the old technique of drawing a mind map. Put everything in it that comes up when you think about the topic and see what you will end up with.

1024 682 Rebecca Moss

Tapping into a new market: Digital PR for international markets

Last week, we covered the basics of entering a new market. We looked at keywords, translations, search intent and some particularities of different markets. Once the website is launched and everything in place, you might want to launch a first digital PR campaign to attract backlinks in the market where you just launched your website. You get as far as translating your content marketing piece and the press release but get stuck at the outreach stage. How to approach a journalist in that market? Does the same campaign work across markets or do we need to make changes?

At this point, just a translation will not do the job. Already when you create the asset, the content piece to outreach with, you want to take local knowledge into account. There might have been facts in your data set that are not interesting for a UK audience but could be beneficial if highlighted for a different target market. Visuals also play a key role in a data-led campaign and this can change from one market to the next.

Why does this look different?

The most important consideration for any digital PR campaign is always whether it will resonate with the audience. Visuals play a key role in this matter and are at the same time one of the big traps you could walk into. To demonstrate what we mean by that, we look at some major publications and how they appear in different markets.

This is Vanityfair for Italy:

Screenshot taken on https://www.vanityfair.it/ on 26/08/2020

Screenshot taken on https://www.vanityfair.it/ on 26/08/2020

This is the same publication for English speaking markets:

Screenshot taken on https://www.vanityfair.com/ on 26/08/2020

Screenshot taken on https://www.vanityfair.com/ on 26/08/2020

That is Vanityfair on the same day for Spain:

Screenshot taken on https://www.revistavanityfair.es/ on 26/08/2020

Screenshot taken on https://www.revistavanityfair.es/ on 26/08/2020

And that is the French version:

Screenshot taken on https://www.vanityfair.fr/ on 26/08/2020

Screenshot taken on https://www.vanityfair.fr/ on 26/08/2020

If we compare all those websites, the only constant seems to be the font of the logo, everything else is changing from images to colour schemes and use of text. The reason for this is a difference in audience perception.

It is not a coincidence or singular case. To prove that we look at Business Insider in different markets.

Germans are very business-like:

Screenshot taken from https://www.businessinsider.de/ on 26/08/2020

Screenshot taken from https://www.businessinsider.de/ on 26/08/2020

Italians even embed Facebook in their business insights:

Screenshot taken from https://it.businessinsider.com/ on 26/08/2020

Screenshot taken from https://it.businessinsider.com/ on 26/08/2020

The French do it too:Screenshot taken from https://www.businessinsider.fr/on 26/08/2020

Screenshot taken from https://www.businessinsider.fr/on 26/08/2020

The Mexican version gets a bit more colourful:

Screenshot taken from https://businessinsider.mx/ on 26/08/2020

Screenshot taken from https://businessinsider.mx/ on 26/08/2020

The Nordics put images to the right side:

Screenshot taken from https://www.businessinsider.com/nordic?IR=C on 26/08/2020

Screenshot taken from https://www.businessinsider.com/nordic?IR=C on 26/08/2020

We could continue playing this game, but you know what we are trying to say. It is best to have a look at some publications in each market before you design your visuals.

How to approach a journalist?

Your asset and the press release are ready, and you start working on your outreach list. You identify suitable websites and journalists for that market, and you start contacting them. No response. What could you possibly have done wrong?

The first thing to look at is the tone of voice you used in your press release and the way how you address the journalist. Your English press release might have started with a casual “Hi Tom” and the translator correctly translated it. But there are markets where casual is too casual. Whilst Italians take these things easy, a journalist in France or Germany will in most cases immediately bin your email if you are not super polite. The English “you” has two different equivalents in other languages. There is an informal way and a formal one. If a language has both variants, you are in most cases better off using the formal way of address and of course their surname. In the English-speaking world, an email that starts with “Dear Mr. Smith” might seem overly polite and would probably make you feel old. However, it is crucial in other markets to keep this type of etiquette.

Why does nobody respond?

Another place to look for clues could be your subject line. Did you translate that one from English? If the answer is yes, look at last week’s example of the movie titles that had changed completely in the different markets. Maybe it is worth reviewing your subject line to get journalists in other markets to open your email.

Once your press release has been updated, take another look at your content asset. We already spoke about design, but are you providing enough detail for that market and are the facts interesting for the audience? One example would be the methodology which should be extremely detailed in markets like Germany and not have a single hole. Journalists in that market are very detail oriented and want to know where exactly the data comes from to ensure accuracy before they republish or link to anything.

That is still no guarantee for a successful digital PR campaign as there is one important factor we have not yet talked about: the media landscape in that country. It is crucial to know the market well to be fully aware of all the traps. In Germany for example, it is important to know that many publications belong to the same media group. Depending on the topic of your campaign and the angles, you might have reached out to multiple journalists and different publications that are all working under the same editorial guidelines. Those are usually the same across a portfolio of publications that are under the same roof. We can for example look at the publishing house Bauer and their portfolio of publications.

This is their lifestyle portfolio:

Screenshot taken from https://baueradvertising.de/portfolio/ on 26/08/2020

Screenshots taken from https://baueradvertising.de/portfolio/ on 26/08/2020

The women’s magazines:

Screenshot taken from https://baueradvertising.de/portfolio/ on 26/08/2020

Those are aimed at women too:

Screenshot taken from https://baueradvertising.de/portfolio/ on 26/08/2020

If you target food publications:

Screenshot taken from https://baueradvertising.de/portfolio/ on 26/08/2020

The health topic is clearly underrepresented:

Screenshot taken from https://baueradvertising.de/portfolio/ on 26/08/2020

There are only 3 for cars:

Screenshot taken from https://baueradvertising.de/portfolio/ on 26/08/2020

And let’s not forget those aimed at men:

Screenshot taken from https://baueradvertising.de/portfolio/ on 26/08/2020

As you can see, there’s a wealth of publications in one hand (and we only looked at one publishing house). Even with multiple angles, if it doesn’t adhere to their guidelines, you will have a hard time because one rejection of your campaign is equal to a rejection of up to 8 publications.

There is only one solution

Before you plan a digital PR campaign for a market you are not familiar with, it is best to get somebody on board who is! Learn as much as you can about the market and its particularities to know what works for the journalist and the reader once you get the journalist to read your press release.

At JBH it would be our pleasure to assist with your international digital PR campaigns. Get in touch!

4 Ways to collect data for digital PR campaigns
1024 682 Rebecca Moss

4 Ways to collect data for digital PR campaigns

Any successful digital PR campaign requires multiple steps from ideation to reporting. We can in general separate it into 5 steps that lead to backlink success. One of those steps involves the collection of data. In times where the public gains more awareness about fake news, you want to make sure that every statement you make is backed by credible data. Apart from that, data-led campaigns have a good success rate and whilst you are digging a bit deeper into it, you might find some interesting angles for your campaign. Here are 4 ways where to get your data:

Your own database

Everybody who owns a website has data of some kind, may it be visitor data from Google Analytics, purchase data in your Shopify account or scroll behaviour and interactions in Hotjar – to just name a few. High-quality data and data accuracy are an important and integral part of business intelligence. At the end of the day, we all want to know how much we have sold and if we can go home with a profit. This data cannot only be used for reporting on business success, but it often holds a wealth of information that can feed into a marketing campaign. For data-led campaigns within the realm of digital PR, the data you have could provide insights into customer behaviour at a certain time of year or market. Maybe the purchase of a certain item has spiked in a certain year or certain market. Can you tie this spike to any cultural, social, or political events?

If your website has a search box or chat functionality, is there anything that users suddenly ask more often than before? What could this mean?

You might already have what you need, all you must do is look at it from a different angle and turn it into a story for a digital PR campaign.

Person checking a sheet with different graphs and data visualisations

Photo by William Iven on Unsplash

Somebody else’s data

You might come to the conclusion that the data you already have within your business, does not provide a full picture for a story and that is okay. You have other data sources available. The most popular one amongst marketing professionals is Google Adwords, the good old keyword planner might have been renamed, but it still provides useful insights into your market and consumer interests. You can find out what people are currently interested in and what they are searching for online. You can also draw on sources like Google Trends, Buzzsumo or Reddit to find out what people are currently talking about.

At JBH we have done exactly that in our campaign for money.co.uk: We combined popularity rating in YouGov with Google Trends and Search Volume to find out which brands were the most popular in the UK at that time.

Social media can be used in a similar way to get your data for digital PR. For a campaign for gousto.co.uk, we have looked at Instagram’s hashtags which are always a good indicator of trending topics. We revealed the most popular regional dishes according to the number of hashtags they had received in every continent around the world.

Last year, we published an extensive resource on the JBH blog, which contains 100 Free Data Sources for Content and Digital PR Campaigns. In here you will find a 100 free and credible data sources, ranging from the ONS through to Crime and Policing which you can weave into your digital PR campaigns.

Top Tip: Sign up to receive email notifications and release calendars for your favourite data sources so you can plan ahead and have content ready to go as soon as the latest iteration of the data lands in your inbox.

Person typing on a laptop and looking at data in Google Search Console

Photo by Myriam Jessier on Unsplash

Market Research and Surveys

Depending on the idea you have for your campaign, there might be cases where it is better to collect new data instead of relying on existing data. Market research and surveys can be powerful tools to gain insight into consumer behaviour or the minds of the population. It is important that you collect data of a representative sample of the target group. For example, if you are analysing UK-wide trends, the survey participants should be from every corner of the country, not just one region. If you later want to compare the stats for every county, you should ensure early to have a representative sample size for each that will make the numbers comparable. Conducting such market research can become a difficult task and it might be worth considering the help of a professional. There are agencies that can conduct the research upon your requests (e.g. how many participants should be asked in which period of time) and will provide you with a clean dataset afterwards that you can use for your data-led campaign.

Person filling out a survey on a tablet

Photo by Celpax on Unsplash

Extensive Research

The first types of data collection are mainly numbers focused and you will end up with interesting percentages to show in your infographics. For some campaigns though, you might want to provide additional information that is not based on statistics. This is where research comes in and, in some cases, it will remind you of the academic research you spent all those years at university doing. For most campaigns, you will not need to hit the library as the internet often holds the information you are looking for.

Girl hidden behind a pile of books in a library

Photo by Daniel on Unsplash

We have done such research for footy.com with a new approach to rank sport stadiums that is all about the fans. We collected the elements that matter most to fans and ranked them. Those elements covered a wide range from public transport availability to eco-friendliness, each receiving a certain score that led up to the stadium rankings. Each of those elements had to be researched separately.

A similar campaign had been created for essentialliving.co.uk where we assigned a score to subway or metro systems in cities around the world to identify the best. The features we researched were amongst others accessibility, pet-friendliness, Wi-Fi connection, comfort and value for money.

Which approach works for you?

If you are now looking at your campaign idea again, you probably know already what type of data you need and where to get it from. Budget might play a key role in this, as some of the above outlined ways for data collection are more time-intense than others. In some case, a third party is involved that provides a paid service.

If you are still unsure where to get your data from, it might be worth getting back to the ideation. Maybe you are working on a topic that is too abstract or for which it is not possible to gather qualitative, accurate data. Those things happen. You can always change the angle of your campaign depending on the data that is accessible and what is feasible for you. And in any case, JBH can support you along the way.

24 Types of content you can create beyond an infographic
1024 682 Jane Hunt

24 types of content you can create beyond an infographic

For some in the digital PR industry, infographics are an outdated technique, for others it is still a valid type of content and for outreach agencies, they have proven to be phenomenally successful to attract visitors and links. The reason for this is that an infographic combines data and story telling and makes information easily accessible for a wide audience.

Stories and data are the ingredients of creative link building and for every successful backlink campaign, you need to decide at some point how you want to tell your story, in other words: what type of content you want to create.

We can generally differentiate between text, visual, audio and interactive content and we can identify four different functions:

  • Attraction (attract the right audience)
  • Affinity (make the audience trust and like you)
  • Action (make the audience take an action)
  • Authority (demonstrate experience and establish yourself as an authority)

When you create content for digital PR and content marketing, it should fulfil all 4 functions and the chances of success increase remarkably if it triggers an emotional response.

Whilst infographics tick all of these boxes (and have for several years), we cannot ignore the fact that the world keeps on moving and consider new alternatives that involve virtual and augmented reality and the rise of audio content in the shape of podcasts.

These are the opportunities you have for content marketing in 2020

1. Podcasts

We all have heard of or even listened to a podcast in recent times. They are on a steep rise and can be considered the most popular type of content these days, statistical data confirms the popularity of podcasts. But is it the right type of content for your campaigns? Think about how you can transform your data story into an audio format. Maybe you can conduct expert interviews to tell the story, but also keep in mind that a podcast might not be the right format and it requires some audio editing skills to sound professional. Apart from that, podcasts are a frequent and regular format, not a one-off.

2. Checklists & Listicles

Content in the shape of a list has always worked and will continue to work because it makes data visually accessible by working like a road map and providing quick answers. In times where attention spans get shorter and readers become lazy and opposed to long pieces of text, a list becomes ever more attractive. Listicles, best ways and top X- headlines usually generate a good number of clicks. The best examples for this type of content are travel checklists such as the one by Eaglecreek.com or the below by Smartertravel.com:

The Ultimate Packing List by SmarterTravel

Listicles are popular in any industry and for any topic, but also for this one, travel is the one that gets our attention as Lonelyplanet.com proves with the yearly “best in travel”:

3. How-to-content

The success behind this type of content can be found in the fact that the reader learns something new by reading or watching. “How to” also is a popular query that users ask search engines such a Google for if they seek advice when confronted with a complicated task. This type of content is often realized in a video tutorial. The first use case that comes to mind are DIY tasks, this example of B&Q proves that:

Screenshot of a B&Q video about how to fix a dripping tap

4. Video content

This leads us to the next type of content that has been increasing in popularity over the past decade: videos. The above is an example for a video tutorial, but you can also use this format for demonstrations of how a product works, customer testimonials or explainer videos with catchy animations. “Catchy” is the keyword here because in times where 15-second-videos on TikTok are on the rise and attention spans decreasing, your video needs to be ever more engaging, educational and entertaining to make it past the first few seconds.

5. Case studies

This is the type of content that allows you to show your expertise and the work you have previously done successfully. Think about how you want to explain what you have done and what you have achieved. Here at JBH we have run several campaigns in the past that we have analysed in our digital PR case studies.

6. Webinars, slides & presentations

Webinars have been around for quite some time but have seen a recent rise during the times of COVID-19 since in-person-conferences and meetups have been put on hold. Running a webinar allows you to prove your expertise and can in similar ways as how-to-content attract an audience that is looking for specific information or to expand their knowledge. A webinar is also a good opportunity for content syndication as you can create additional content such as a video recording, slide shows and presentations that will keep on attracting visitors until the topic becomes outdated. At JBH we have embedded this into our strategy as well, e.g. in the webinar about Digital PR during a pandemic.

7. Expert roundups and interviews

This type of content might come as part of your webinar: You can invite experts of your industry that present at your webinar, you can interview them or even organise a panel discussion. This can also be done offline, but it is always a good idea to record it to use the content you create in different ways and make it accessible for your audience at a later stage. Interviews with experts can be recorded in a video, be part of a podcast or published as text.

In the context of digital PR, the experts that are mostly referenced are journalists and we have spoken to some of them:

8. Authoritative blog posts

A good blog posts answers questions that your audience and potential customers have and provides additional insights into complex topics. Blogging is also a good opportunity to regularly show your expertise and become an authority in your field.

9. Standout opinion pieces

Opinion content originated in traditional journalism and you will still find this section in any newspaper online and offline. That is because it works, especially when it comes to controversial topics that people want to get different opinions on. It gives you the opportunity to communicate an informative message and kick-start a discussion. The risk though is to become offensive or to communicate an opinion in unsuitable ways. Better read this type of content twice before publishing it.

Screenshot of the Opinion section in The Guardian on 13/07/2020

10. Original research pieces

Most content nowadays is modelled after other content that has been published online. Therefore, original research data can make you stand out. You could conduct a scientific research or run a survey for example. You also might have some interesting data within your business that you can share. Most infographics these days are based on data research.

11. Trending content

Following current trends and incorporating them into your content publication provides a good opportunity and shows your expertise within your industry. News content is the best example, but keep in mind that it has a short shelf-life.

12. Compelling images

Images can be a good way to convey a message in an emotional way and can break up long form content into more digestible chunks when working with decreasing attention spans. To increase your chances of the image being shared, you can add a quote. A good example for image content is the photo of the day published by National Geographic.

Screenshot of the Photo of the Day in National Geographic, taken on 13/07/2020

13. Screenshots

This type of content should never stand on its own, but it can be useful to visualize how a product works (an app for example) or in written how-to-content. They can make it easier to explain a concept and give the audience additional insights. If you use a screenshot for demonstrations, they work best if accompanied by a customer testimonial.

14. Memes, comics, illustrations

We all have seen this type of content multiple times and memes, also in private messages, do not seem to lose their popularity. They work because they trigger an emotional reaction which in most cases is related to fun and entertainment. As such, they are also memorable, and the chances are high that they will get shared.

Meme with baby saying "Ate Spaghetti while wearing a white shirt. Didn't get sauce on it."

15. Gifographics

This is a combination of the established infographic and the younger version of imagery in the shape of a gif. It works well because it makes an infographic more interactive and keeps the viewer engaged. Quicksprout has published a gifographic that explains how Google works.

16. Long-form content

This type of content is self-explanatory. It is a long piece of content that you can enhance with additional types of content such as imagery. How long this content really should be, depends on the topic and what you are trying to say. You should not write content just for the sake of it. If what you want to say can be said in 500 words, do not create long-form content.

17. Comprehensive reviews

If you are writing a review, you are probably doing so because you want to promote or sell this product on your website. In that case, it is important to keep the review as objective as possible. If there are any negatives to it, you should mention those as well. If you want your customers to trust you, you must be honest and if a product only has negatives or requires you to lie, maybe you should not promote it.

Reviews can now be enhanced with different types of mark-up that will appear in rich snippets in Google and with star ratings. Trustedreviews.com provides examples such as this review of a coffee machine:

Example of a coffee machine review18. Whitepapers

This type of content can be compared to a scientific research paper. You generally need a lot of data and information that you present in a well-written way. Before you start creating a Whitepaper, you should be sure that it is the right type of content for your audience. They should be interested in reading long-form content with scientific character.

19. eBooks

Some would argue that this type of content has been over-used in recent times and it seems to become a technique that is seen as spam. It is mostly used to get users to sign up for a newsletter. In return, they will receive the eBook.

20. Newsletters

Newsletters are mostly used in email marketing to keep an existing audience engaged. They are not suitable to attract new customers or links and therefore not used in digital PR.

21. Contests

This type of content is a well-established technique to get attention and to grow your audience quickly. Participants usually submit their email addresses after fulfilling a task or solving a puzzle to enter a prize draw. Based on the results, you can create additional content where you feature the winner picking up the prize or meeting a celebrity.

Screenshot of a meet and greet to win on Twitter https://twitter.com/corksredfm/status/847901325039894530

22. Surveys

Surveys work in a similar way as contests: Users submit information and, in most cases,, they get something in return, vouchers for example. Depending on what the survey is about and what participants get out of it, it can generate different levels of traction. More important though is what you do with the survey results as those provide opportunity for further content creation.

23. Personality tests, quizzes, tools and widgets

Quizzes and tests draw on human curiosity, use gamification strategies and interactive engagement. They usually reach the audience on a personal and emotional level and the better the topic of your personality test, the more likely it will get shared. Childhood memories such as Disney characters always seem to work:

Screenshot of a quiz "Which disney character are you?"

24. Social media posts

When we think of digital PR and backlinks, we often think of the website content and ignore other channels where our audience might find us. But the content you publish on your website can be syndicated on social media to reach a wider audience. What you should keep in mind is how you portray your brand and how you get the user to click through to your website.

There are different social media channels and the landscape keeps on changing. It is important to find the right channel for your product and your audience to then create content that resonates with them and is adequate for the channel. Video content for example is best placed on YouTube, whereas images are more suitable for Instagram or Pinterest, statements and opinions are for Twitter and short video sequences for TikTok.

What type of content to use?

After having seen so many opportunities it might seem to be an overwhelming decision to make. It can be useful to look at your data, your product, and your audience to find out what would work best in any given situation. The opportunities are endless and if you are looking for advice on your content marketing and digital PR strategy, please get in touch with us at JBH.

1024 682 Rebecca Moss

Reddit, Get Set, Go!

When it comes to ideation, it can be difficult to know where to begin. Before you brainstorm with your team, you’re going to need to pool together a bank of potential ideas. This can be pretty daunting; even the most creative digital marketer will struggle to magic ideas out of the air.

Luckily, there’s Reddit. The self-proclaimed ‘front page of the internet,’ Reddit is a fantastic resource to mine when you’re getting started, and can be an invaluable tool when it comes to generating creative ideas.

What is Reddit?

For those who haven’t used it before, Reddit is an American news discussion site. Registered members submit content to the site in the form of links, text posts and images, which are then up or down voted by other members. The more upvotes, the more popular the content, and the more likely it is to be seen.

Reddit is organised into boards known as subreddits, which cover just about everything – news, movies, health, fitness, books, games, music – and get more and more niche the deeper you go.

Essentially replacing the online forums of the 2000s, Reddit is a now a vast melting point of content, creativity, and idea sharing, and essentially, the river source for the sea of the entire internet. If you’re reading about something on a news site or Facebook, you can probably bet that it started in some form on Reddit.

The World’s Biggest Focus Group

Reddit is also huge – the 19th most popular website in the world, with around 330 million active users talking in 138,000 subreddits – but don’t let this overwhelm you. Reddit’s size is a positive. Think of the site as the world’s biggest focus group.

Reddit’s diverse user base makes it a useful tool for mining ideas in just about any subject. It’s just about knowing where to look.

Mining Reddit

First thing to do is download Reddit Enhancement Suite – this is a handy Chrome extension which allows you to keep scrolling indefinitely down Reddit without having to click through pages.

Next, in the search bar, start playing around with a few keywords which relate to your client.

The trick is to look at broader subjects which relate to your client without being too focused or ‘salesy.’ Start out wide, and then chop down as you go.

So for example, for a banking client, look broadly at keywords such as:

  • ‘Finance’
  • ‘Insurance’
  • ‘Homes’
  • ‘Property’
  • ‘Mortgages’
  • ‘Money advice.’

Set the toggles below the search bar to ‘Top’ and ‘All Time’ – which will bring up the most popular posts on the site.


As you go, make a note of the most popular posts – those with the most upvotes, or those with the most comments. This suggests the topic being discussed is one a large amount of people are interested in, and which might therefore be a good avenue to start mining for ideas. Don’t be afraid to make a note of posts with less upvotes but which are so weird, or so unique they stand out to you. The most original ideas can be found this way! Make notes as you go – jot down any common themes or anything that inspires you, and don’t worry about what you’ll do with it at this stage. 

Have a look at relevant subreddits too – i.e. r/finance – and make a note of posts there with the most upvotes.

In 5 minutes, you’ll end up with something like this:

So for our hypothetical banking client, we’ve got a few stems of ideas to build on here:

  • Unusual or non-traditional paths to financial success
  • Budgeting advice
  • Milestones of life
  • Debt regrets
  • Debts of the world
  • What we spend in a week
  • Regrets of homeowners
  • Unexpected deal-breakers when it comes to homes – i.e. neighbours, pets
  • Income vs house price
  • How far money goes in different countries
  • What size home you can get in different countries
  • Renting vs mortgages

All of which you can take into your team brainstorming sessions and begin to build out into some great ideas together.

1024 682 Rebecca Moss

How to Write a Cracking Headline For Your Digital PR Campaign

The key to writing a cracking headline isn’t just down to having a knack for it. There are so many factors that come into the mix and help you decide what will grab that person’s attention. 

Sometimes, you will look at a campaign and headlines will ping into your mind left-right-and-center, but other times, writer’s block can hit. Whether it is for your digital campaign or an article, here is a straightforward guide to eye-catching headlines, every time.

How to Research Headlines

Search for your hook on Google to spark ideas. Once you see what journalists are using, you can get a better idea of what you need to focus on in your headlines. 

For example, if your campaign is about Instagram’s most popular food, you can search “Instagrammable food news” to see what magazines and top tier news websites are using for their headlines.

Top Tip: Take a look at the top headlines featured on the homepage of your favourite newspapers and try to copy the wording, phrasing and commonly used words.  

Digital PR’s Get Writer’s Block Too…

There are lots of avenues that you can go down when your mind can’t process an eye-catching angle. When writer’s block hits, you should read articles about your subject matter, which may help to spark some interesting headlines. 

Also, Twitter can be useful for battling writer’s block (even if common misconceptions say otherwise). Finding out what is trending around your subject matter allows you to see your subject in a different light. More importantly, it shows you what your audience is discussing, so you can mould your headlines to what they want to see.

Look Back at Your Campaign and Data

Repeatedly, read through your data points to gain some perspective on what you are trying to say. What is the campaign accomplishing and what questions could it be answering. Do you have any main data points that could be worked into headlines? Consider what sums up your campaign or narrative in one sentence.

Use your Statistics as Headlines

If you have any interesting or shocking statistics, use them as a headline. Although some may consider this to be ‘click-bait’, it is the perfect strategy for developing an intriguing headline, as long as you have the evidence to back up your claim. This can be helpful when promoting or outreaching your campaign, too.

Top Tip: If your statistic can be expressed in different ways, try it. For example, 30% can be expressed as ‘a third’ or ‘one in three’. Try it and see what has the most impact. 

When You Feel Like You’ve Used Every Possible Headline…

Get a fresh outlook from a colleague or anyone for that matter. Sometimes when you have been so involved in a campaign, it can be difficult to see any other possible angles. Ask them what they think stands out instantly as the most interesting piece of information in your campaign or narrative. This fresh outlook could put you onto a whole new angle completely, meaning lots of new headlines. 

If in Doubt – here is your failsafe guide to writing a cracking headline:

  • Ask a rhetorical question (only if your campaign can answer that question)
  • Practice writing headlines in the style of your favourite publications
  • Use your data as headlines
  • A cheeky pun is useful for any off the cuff magazines/ newspapers. 
  • Aim for shock factor but not click-baity (only if you have the facts to back it up)
  • 1024 682 Rebecca Moss

    100 Free Data Sources for Content and Digital PR Campaigns

    There are a number of reasons why we place such a big emphasis on data when it comes to content marketing and digital PR campaigns. We’ve even explored how journalists use data as a way to craft compelling stories, and how digital PR teams can look to implement these techniques into their campaigns.

    Data has the power to:

    • Measure your online standing – Website traffic, social media followers and online ratings.
    • Analyse the effectiveness of your work – Open rates, click-through rates, bounce rates and cost per conversion.
    • Discover your return on investment – Calculate your cost per lead or quantity of leads generated.

    However, it can also be a game-changer in terms of content creation – there’s a wealth of data available online just waiting to be curated, which can provide your audience with intriguing insights or indisputable information that encourages movement down the funnel towards those all-important conversions.

    Best of all…

    …several data sources (the following 100 to be precise) are absolutely free and ready to be used in your digital PR campaigns.

    1. Statista

    “The #1 business data platform in the world with insights and facts from 600 industries across 50 countries.”

    1. UNData

    Specialised databases, popular statistical tables and country profiles..

    1. Wikipedia

    If you’re worried about accuracy, only use data that comes with a reference or external link for further reading.

    1. DBpedia

    DBpedia gathers structured content from valuable information over at Wikipedia.

    1. Amazon Public Data Sets

    A registry featuring datasets that are available from Amazon Web Services resources.

    1. Google Public Data Explorer

    Public-interest datasets that feature graphs and tables for a better understanding of information.

    1. Pew Research

    Pew Research Centre claims it generates “a foundation of facts that enriches the public dialogue and supports sound decision-making.”

    1. Datasets Subreddit

    A great place to share, find and discuss datasets, but finding your niche could be tricky.

    1. Enigma Public 

    The “world’s broadest collection of public data” to “empower people to improve the world around them.”

     

    1. Data.gov

    The home of the US Government’s open data, covering everything from agriculture and finance to manufacturing and public safety.

    1. Data.gov.uk

    The home of the UK government’s open data, featuring an equally extensive range of useful information.

    1. YouGov

    An overview of what the UK’s opinion is on things like politics, entertainment, retail, technology, media, lifestyle and more.

    1. WhatDoTheyKnow

    WhatDoTheyKnow helps you make Freedom of Information (FOI) requests to the government and public sector.

    1. UK Data Service

    A collection of UK government-sponsored surveys, longitudinal studies, UK census data, business data and more.

    1. European Union Open Data Portal

    The single point of access to a growing range of data from the institutions and other bodies of the European Union.

    1. U.S. Census Bureau

    Government-informed statistics about the lives of US citizens including population, economy, education, geography, and more.

    1. Socrata

    A mission-driven software company that enables you to explore government-related data via built-in visualisation tools. 

    1. Canada Open Data

    Pilot project that wants to create greater transparency and accountability with government and geospatial datasets

    1. Datacatalogs.org

    Open government data from the US, EU, Canada, CKAN, and more.

    1. Gapminder

    European ‘fact tank’ that fights misconceptions about global development using a wide range of data sources.

    1. UNDP’s Human Development Index

    A ranking of country progress under the lens of human development.

    1. OECD Aid Database

    Visualisation of data showing aid collected from governments.

    1. Qlik Data Market

     Free package provides access to datasets covering world population, currencies, development indicators and weather.

     

    1. World Bank Open Data

    Featuring 3000 datasets and 14000 indicators encompassing microdata, time series statistics, and geospatial data.

    1. IMF Economic Data

    Including but not limited to global financial stability reports, regional economic reports, international financial statistics, exchange rates and directions of trade.

    1. UN Comtrade Database

    A repository of official international trade statistics and relevant analytical tables.

    1. Google Finance

    Real-time stock market information, financial news, currency conversions, and tracked portfolios.

    1. Global Financial Data

    A source to analyse the twists and turns of the global economy with data on over 60,000 companies covering 300 years.

    1. U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

    Mainly reports about the gross domestic product (GDP) of the United States but also information about income, corporate profits and government spending.

    1. National Bureau of Economic Research

    Data concerning industry, productivity, trade, international finance, industry and more.

    1. Financial Times

    More than a news site, the FT also publishes a broad range of business data and information.

    1. OpenCorporates

    The largest open database of companies in the world.

    1. The Atlas of Economic Complexity

    Research and data visualisation tool used to explore global trade dynamics,

    1. World Bank Doing Business Database

    Resource that evaluates business environment indicators, such as capabilities and costs, around the world.

    1. Visualizing Economics

    A self-explanatory site featuring data visualisations about the economy.

    1. Federal Reserve Economic Database

    Download and track 567,000 US and international time series from 87 sources.

    1. Buzz Data

    Resource that provides UK businesses with targeted business address data.

    1. Financial Data Finder at OSU

    Large catalogue of financial data sets.

    1. TripAdvisor

    A wealth of free information about destinations to help support your travel or lifestyle campaign. 

    1. EU-Startups

    Directory listing the number of start-up businesses in the EU, alongside their industry and sector. Perfect if your campaign is targeting new businesses publications in and around Europe.  

    advertising social media data

    1. Buffer

    Data insights, survey findings and regular reports about digital marketing can be found on the Buffer blog.

    1. Moz

    Along with how-to articles and whiteboard walkthroughs, the Moz Blog also publishes data-driven insight pieces.

    1. HubSpot

    Large repository of marketing statistics and trends along with tools for social media, SEO and web analytics.

    1. Content Marketing Institute

    Articles, resources and research all about the world of content marketing.

    1. Facebook API

    Using the Graph API, you can retrieve data all sorts of data from Facebook.

    1. Twitter API

    Stay up to date with worldwide conversations by connecting your website or application to the Twitter Platform.

    1. Instagram API

    You can use the Instagram API to build non-automated, high-quality apps and services.

    1. Complete Public Reddit Comments Corpus

    Here you’ll find over one billion public comments posted on Reddit between 2007 and 2015 for training language algorithms.

     

    1. data.police.uk

    Open data about crime and policing in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

    1. FBI Crime Statistics

    Statistical reports and publications detailing specific offences and outlining crime trends.

     

    1. UNICEF Dataset

    UNICEF has compiled relevant data about education, child labour, maternal mortality, water and sanitation, antenatal care and much more.

    1. NHS Health and Social Care Information Centre

    The NHS produces more than 260 official and national statistical publications every year, which includes national comparative data for secondary uses.

    1. Healthdata.gov

    125 years of US healthcare data including claim-level Medicare data, epidemiology and population statistics.

    1. U.S. Food & Drug Administration

    A compressed data file of the Drugs@FDA database, which is updated once a week.

    1. MedicinePlus

    Resource for health statistics such as the rate at which people are catching the flu and the average cost of a medical procedure.

    1. America’s Health Rankings

    An analysis of US national health on a state-by-state basis using historical data.

    1. The Broad Institute — Cancer Program Data

    Access the cancer-related datasets of the Broad Institute’s scientists.

    1. Human Rights Data Analysis Group

    The non-profit, nonpartisan group applying rigorous science to the analysis of human rights violations around the world.

    1. Harvard Law School

    Everything from international relations to human rights data courtesy of political institution databases.

    1. The Armed Conflict Database by Uppsala University

    Data that dives into minor and major violent conflicts around the world.

    1. Amnesty International

    Human rights information, run independently of any political ideology, economic interest, or religion.

     

    1. FiveThirtyEigh

    Primarily a news and opinion website, but its content is supported by in-depth data and statistical models.

    1. Google Scholar

    Another Alphabet-owned resource but with a more academic slant – articles, theses, books, whitepapers etc.

    1. The Upshot

    A section of the New York Times that examines politics, policy and everyday life, primarily using data.

    1. The New York Times Developer Network

    Search articles, retrieve headlines and discover media dating back to 1851.

    1. Associated Press API

    Search and download content using your own tools without having to visit AP portals.

    1. Million Song Dataset

    A collection of 28 datasets containing audio features and metadata for a million music tracks.

    1. BFI Film Forever

    Research data and market intelligence about the UK film industry and culture.

    1. IFPI

    Key statistical highlights of the global recording industry.

    1. Academic Rights Press

    The world’s leading aggregator of global music industry data.

    1. OpenLibrary Data Dumps

    Datasets on books including catalogues from libraries around the world.

    1. One Million Audio Cover Images 

    Dataset hosted at archive.org covering music released around the world, for use in image processing research.

    1. SkiftStats

    The latest statistics, research and data about the travel industry.

    1. Search the World

    Population, weather and travel information for millions of locations worldwide.

    1. U.S. Travel Association

    Covers a wide variety of travel-related topics, primarily relating to the economy.

     

    1. Labelled Faces in the Wild

    13,000 collated and labelled images of human faces, for use in developing applications involving facial recognition.

    1. Microsoft Marco

    Microsoft’s open machine learning datasets for training systems in reading comprehension and question answering.

    1. Machine Learning Dataset Repository

    Collection of open datasets contributed by data scientists involved in machine learning projects.

    1. UCI Machine Learning Repository

    Dataset specifically pre-processed for machine learning.

    1. CERN Open Data 

    More than one petabyte of data from particle physics experiments carried out by CERN.

    1. Natural History Museum Data Portal

    Information on nearly four million historical specimens in the London museum’s collection, as well as scientific sound recordings of the natural world.

    1. Microsoft Azure Data Markets Free Datasets

    Freely available datasets covering everything from agriculture to weather.

    1. NASA Exoplanet Archive

    Public datasets covering planets and stars gathered by NASA’s space exploration missions.

    1. LondonAir 

    Pollution and air quality data from across London.

    1. National Centers for Environmental Information

    Quick access to many of NCEI’s climate and weather datasets, products and various resources.

    1. National Climatic Data Center

    Huge collection of environmental, meteorological and climate data sets from the US National Climatic Data Center.

     

    1. Yelp Open Datasets

    There are 5,996,996 reviews, 188,593 businesses, 280,991 pictures and 10 metropolitan areas included in Yelp Open Datasets.

    1. Capterra

    Directory covering business software and reviews.

    1. Monster

    In-depth data source for job market and career opportunities.

    1. Glassdoor

    Directory where you can research companies, compare salaries and read employee reviews.

    1. eBay Market Data Insights 

    Data on millions of online sales and auctions from eBay.

    1. Junar

     Data scraping service that also includes data feeds.

     

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